Wednesday, April 17, 2024
American University
A project of the Rev. James B. Simpson Fellowship at American University’s School of Communication

Because the end of a war is traditionally thought to be the moment when a president’s war powers begin to ebb, bringing combat to a close in Afghanistan and Iraq should lead to a reduction in executive power — including the legitimate basis for detaining the enemy.

american-unversity
Because the end of a war is traditionally thought to be the moment when a president's war powers begin to ebb, bringing combat to a close in Afghanistan and Iraq should lead to a reduction in executive power — including the legitimate basis for detaining the enemy.
— Mary L. Dudziak